Pacific Coast Public Television Association

The largest public television station in the Pacific Northwest

Pacific Coast Public Television AssociationOur Impact Why We Exist

Canadians have been long-time supporters of KCTS 9 — both in terms of viewership and funding. More than a half of KCTS 9 viewers are located in Canada and substantial funding for KCTS 9 programming comes from the support provided through Pacific Coast Public Television Association donors.

Pacific Coast Public Television Association (a registered Canadian charity and friend of KCTS 9) takes great pride in supporting an organization that broadcasts thousands of hours of programs on several digital channels – programs that:

  • inspire viewers to expand their points of view
  • inform growing minds of all ages and
  • involve individuals in their community

KCTS 9 programs gives a voice to our distinctive communities including IN Close, the new weekly current affairs series; and Reel NW, showcasing independent films. KCTS 9 viewers across Canada have shared in the fun of Downton Abbey, Sherlock and Mr. Selfridge; explored 50 years of natural history filmmaking with David Attenborough on Nature and enjoyed learning about the past with Antiques Roadshow.

KCTS 9 provides a shining beacon in television for everyone, particularly our children. It offers a safe place for young people to challenge their intelligence and spark their imaginations. Shows such as Sesame Street, Sid the Science Kid and Super Why truly make a difference in our youngest community members.

These extraordinary PBS experiences are made possible for all of us because of the generous support provided by Canadian donors to Pacific Coast Public Television Association, a registered Canadian charity and proud friend of KCTS 9.

Our Story What We Do

Funding for KCTS 9 programming comes in part, from the support provided through Pacific Coast Public Television Association donors. Pacific Coast takes great pride in supporting an organization that has since it's early days inspired viewers to expand their points of view, informed growing minds of all ages and involved individuals in their community.

KCTS 9 first went on the air on Dec. 7, 1954, broadcasting from the campus of the University of Washington and using equipment donated by KING-TV owner Dorothy Bullitt.

During the 1950s and 1960s, KCTS 9 primarily supplied classroom instructional programs used in Washington State's K–12 schools, plus National Educational Television programs. Outside of schoolrooms, KCTS 9's audience among the general public was somewhat limited, and most programming was in black-and-white until the mid-70s.

In 1970, National Educational Television was absorbed into the newly created Public Broadcasting Service. Under PBS affiliation, KCTS 9 began offering a vastly enhanced scope of programming for the general public, including British programming.

KCTS 9 moved to its present location on the Seattle Center campus in 1986. KCTS 9 became independent of the University of Washington in 1987.

KCTS 9 is seen throughout southwestern British Columbia on local cable systems, as well as across Canada on the Bell TV and Shaw Direct satellite providers, as well as on many other Canadian cable TV systems. KCTS 9 receives substantial financial support from its far-flung Canadian audience as well as from viewers in Washington State.

Since 1994, KCTS 9 has also operated KYVE 47 in Yakima, Washington which has served central Washington since Nov. 1, 1962.

Our Programs How We Do It

We offer a range of programming for all audiences. Please visit our website to learn more.

What You Can Do

Canadian donors support educational broadcasting through Pacific Coast Public Television Association, a registered Canadian charity and proud friend of KCTS 9. Please visit our website to learn more.

Contact

604.685.7375
Charitable Number: 131879744RR0001

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